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Showing: 1-10 results of 1590

Illustrated thoroughly, Biomolecular Archaeology is the first book to clearly guide students through the study of ancient DNA: how to analyze biomolecular evidence (DNA, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) to address important archaeological questions. The first book to address the scope and methods of this new cross-disciplinary area of research for archaeologistsOffers a completely up-to-date overview of the latest research in this innovative... more...

While the study of networks has grown exponentially in the past decade and is now having an impact on how archaeologists study ancient societies, its emergence in the field has been dislocated. This volume provides a coherent framework on network analysis in current archaeological practice by pulling together its main themes and approaches to show how it is changing the way archaeologists face the key questions of regional interaction. Working with... more...

This volume utilizes both archaeological and textual data pertaining to Egyptian military bases to examine the evolution of Egypt's foreign policy in the New Kingdom. The types of structures erected to house soldiers and administrators in Syria-Palestine, Nubia, and Libya differed in ways that do much to illuminate the nature of imperial aims in these subject territories.

Humans occupy a material environment that is constantly changing. Yet in the twentieth century archaeologists studying British prehistory have overlooked this fact in their search for past systems of order and pattern. Artefacts and monuments were treated as inert materials which were the outcomes of social ideas and processes. As a result materials were variously characterized as stable entities such as artefact categories, styles or symbols in an... more...

Just as a single pot starts with a lump of clay, the study of a piece’s history must start with an understanding of its raw materials. This principle is the foundation of Pottery Analysis, the acclaimed sourcebook that has become the indispensable guide for archaeologists and anthropologists worldwide. By grounding current research in the larger history of pottery and drawing together diverse approaches to the study of pottery, it... more...


Augustus' Res Gestae , inscribed on two pillars at the entrance to the emperor's tomb, is a unique text that still provokes debate concerning its translation and interpretation. This detailed study looks back over four hundred years of research, focusing in particularly on the rivalry between the English, French and Germans to produce the first definitive edition during the 18th and 19th centuries. Ridley then discusses the editions and... more...

This book is a synthesis of the fundamental method and theory of behavioral archaeology, organized in terms of the temporal order in which general topics have been addressed. The development of key ideas is recounted in relation to the historical contexts in which they emerged. Among the major topics addressed are philosophy of science and the scientific method, artifacts and human behavior, archaeological inference, formation processes of the... more...

In Landscape of the Mind, John F. Hoffecker explores the origin and growth of the human mind, drawing on archaeology, history, and the fossil record. He suggests that, as an indirect result of bipedal locomotion, early humans developed a feedback relationship among their hands, brains, and tools that evolved into the capacity to externalize thoughts in the form of shaped stone objects. When anatomically modern humans evolved a parallel capacity to... more...

Animals played a crucial role in many aspects of Celtic life: in the economy, hunting, warfare, art, literature and religion. Such was their importance to this society, that an intimate relationship between humans and animals developed, in which the Celts believed many animals to have divine powers. In Animals in Celtic Life and Myth, Miranda Green draws on evidence from early Celtic documents, archaeology and iconography to consider the manner in... more...

In mid-twentieth-century Britain, an archaeological vision of the British landscape reassured and enchanted a number of writers, artists, photographers, and film-makers. From John Piper, Eric Ravilious and Shell guide books, to photographs of bomb damage, aerial archaeology, and The Wizard of Oz, Kitty Hauser delves into these evocative interpretations and looks at how they affected the way the landscape was seen.