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Showing: 1-10 results of 141

This book results from a summer school held at Cornell University in 1992. The participants were graduate students and postdoctoral researchers selected from a broad range of interests and backgrounds in ecological studies. The summer school was the second in a continuing series whose underlying aim­ and the aim of this volume-is to bring together the different methods and concepts underpinning terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecology. The first... more...

In the twenty-first century, we take the means to measure time for granted, without contemplating the sophisticated concepts on which our time scales are based. This volume presents the evolution of concepts of time and methods of time keeping up to the present day. It outlines the progression of time based on sundials, water clocks, and the Earth's rotation, to time measurement using pendulum clocks, quartz crystal clocks, and atomic frequency... more...

Medieval Latin Christian Texts on the Jewish Calendar opens up a previously unknown chapter in the history of Jewish-Christian intellectual exchange during the Middle Ages by presenting critical editions, English translations, and in-depth studies of five Medieval Latin Christian Texts on the Jewish Calendar.

Why do we remember the past and not the future? Do we inhabit time or does time inhabit us? What does it mean that time "flies by?" Where does it go when it flies? This transformative, enchanting book will completely change the way we think about time. 

From epigraphical, archaeological, and literary evidence Jon D. Mikalson has here assembled all relevant data concerning the dates of Athenian festivals, religious ceremonies, and legislative assemblies. This information has been used to revise and update our knowledge of the calendar as it reflects Athenian life. The facts and conclusions that emerge from the author's analysis correct some earlier assumptions. He brings to light... more...


What altered states of consciousness―the dissolution of feelings of time and self―can tell us about the mystery of consciousness. During extraordinary moments of consciousness―shock, meditative states and sudden mystical revelations, out-of-body experiences, or drug intoxication―our senses of time and self are altered; we may even feel time and self dissolving. These experiences have long been ignored by mainstream science,... more...

Timekeeping is an essential activity in the modern world, and we take it for granted that our lives our shaped by the hours of the day. Yet what seems so ordinary today is actually the extraordinary outcome of centuries of technical innovation and circulation of ideas about time. Shaping the Day is a pathbreaking study of the practice of timekeeping in England and Wales between 1300 and 1800. Drawing on many unique historical sources, ranging from... more...

By 1,800 years ago, speakers of proto-Ch’olan, the ancestor of three present-day Maya languages, had developed a calendar of eighteen twenty-day months plus a set of five days for a total of 365 days. This original Maya calendar, used extensively during the Classic period (200–900 CE), recorded in hieroglyphic inscriptions the dates of dynastic and cosmological importance. Over time, and especially after the Mayas’ contact with... more...

Welcome, intrepid temporal explorers, to the world's first and only field manual/survival guide to time travel!DON'T LEAVE THIS TIME PERIOD WITHOUT IT! Humans from H. G. Wells to Albert Einstein to Bill & Ted have been fascinated by time travel-some say drawn to it like moths to a flame. But in order to travel safely and effectively, newbie travelers need to know the dos and don'ts. Think of this handy little book as the only thing standing... more...

Michael Tooley presents a major new philosophical theory of the nature of time, offering a powerful alternative to the traditional "tensed" and recent "tenseless" accounts of time. He argues for a dynamic conception of the universe, in which past, present, and future are not merely subjective features of experience. He claims that the past and the present are real, while the future is not. Tooley's approach accounts for time in terms of causation. He... more...