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Showing: 1-10 results of 992

Owing to its bizarre nature and its implications for understanding how brains work, synesthesia has recently received a lot of attention in the popular press and motivated a great deal of research and discussion among scientists. The questions generated by these two communities are intriguing: Does the synesthetic phenomenon require awareness and attention? How does a feature that is not present become bound to one that is? Does synesthesia develop or... more...

Hallucinatory phenomena have held the fascination of science since the dawn of medicine, and the popular imagination from the beginning of recorded history. Their study has become a critical aspect of our knowledge of the brain, making significant strides in recent years with advances in neuroimaging, and has established common ground among what normally are regarded as disparate fields. The Neuroscience of Hallucinations synthesizes the most... more...

The expression "Near-Death Experience" is associated in the popular understanding with access to knowledge about our transition between the states of life and death. But how should such experiences be interpreted? Are they verifiable with scientific methods? If so, how can they be explained? Attempting to relate matters of scientific knowledge to subjective experience and the realm of belief is a difficult balancing act and has led to a variety of... more...

The book explains how to understand cognition in terms of brain anatomy, physiology and chemistry, using an approach adapted from techniques for understanding complex electronic systems. These techniques create hierarchies of information process based descriptions on different levels of detail, where higher levels contain less information and can therefore describe complete cognitive phenomena, but are more approximate. The nature of the approximations... more...

Panic disorder is a remarkably common psychological condition, characterized by sudden attacks of intense fear and panic. Approximately 3% of the population will experience some aspect of panic disorder during their lifetime. Incredibly distressing, it can have an adverse effect on most aspects of the person's life, especially if chronic. This new edition of Panic Disorder: The Facts includes valuable new information on treatment and discusses the... more...


More people today report feeling anxious than ever before―even while living in relatively safe and prosperous modern societies. Almost one in five people experiences an anxiety disorder each year, and more than a quarter of the population admits to an anxiety condition at some point in their lives. Here Allan V. Horwitz, a sociologist of mental illness and mental health, narrates how this condition has been experienced, understood,... more...

This well-illustrated book provides step-by-step guidance on the various techniques – microlaryngoscopic, fiberoptic endoscopic and transcutaneous – that can be employed for the purpose of injection laryngoplasty, a surgical procedure in which a foreign material is injected into the vocal fold. The anatomy and function of the region are first explained, with identification of the causes and means of evaluation of glottic and neoglottic... more...

This volume represents a comprehensive overview of the neuropsychology of emotion and the neural mechanisms underlying emotional processing. It draws on recent studies utilizing behavioral paradigms with normal subjects, the brain lesion approach, clinical evaluations of patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders, and neuroimaging techniques. The book opens with an introduction summarizing each chapter and pointing to directions for future... more...

The Handbook of Adult Language Disorders is the essential guide to the scientific and clinical tenets of aphasia study and treatment. It focuses on how language breaks down after focal brain damage, what patterns of impairment reveal about normal language, and how recovery can be optimally facilitated. It is unique in that it reviews studies from the major disciplines in which aphasia research is conducted―cognitive neuropsychology, linguistics,... more...

When Trauma and Recovery was first published in 1992, it was hailed as a groundbreaking work. In the intervening years, Herman’s volume has changed the way we think about and treat traumatic events and trauma victims. In a new afterword, Herman chronicles the incredible response the book has elicited and explains how the issues surrounding the topic have shifted within the clinical community and the culture at large.Trauma and... more...