Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.

Download links will be available after you disable the ad blocker and reload the page.
Showing: 30701-30710 results of 30723

The aim of the present work is two-fold. Firstly it aims at a giving an account of many existing algorithms for calculating with finite-dimensional Lie algebras. Secondly, the book provides an introduction into the theory of finite-dimensional Lie algebras. These two subject areas are intimately related. First of all, the algorithmic perspective often invites a different approach to the theoretical material than the one taken in various other... more...

This book provides a definition of Green functors for a finite group G, and of modules over it, in terms of the category of finite G-sets. Some classical constructions, such as the associated categroy or algebra, have a natural interpretation in that framework. Many notions of ring theory can be extended to Green functors (opposite Green functor, bimodules, Morita theory, simple modules, centres,...). There are moreover connections between Green... more...

Research in systems biology requires the collaboration of researchers from diverse backgrounds, including biology, computer science, mathematics, statistics, physics, and biochemistry. These collaborations, necessary because of the enormous breadth of background needed for research in this field, can be hindered by differing understandings of the limitations and applicability of... more...

The discovery of infinite products by Wallis and infinite series by Newton marked the beginning of the modern mathematical era. It allowed Newton to solve the problem of finding areas under curves defined by algebraic equations, an achievement beyond the scope of the earlier methods of Torricelli, Fermat, and Pascal. Newton and his contemporaries, including Leibniz and the Bernoullis, concentrated on mathematical analysis and physics. Euler's... more...

R is a powerful tool for statistics and graphics, but getting started with this language can be frustrating. This short, concise book provides beginners with a selection of how-to recipes to solve simple problems with R. Each solution gives you just what you need to know to use R for basic statistics, graphics, and regression. You'll find recipes on reading data files, creating data frames, computing basic statistics, testing means and correlations,... more...


Johnson provides a comprehensive, accurate introduction to statistics for business professionals who need to learn how to apply key concepts. The chapters have been updated with real-world data to make the material more relevant. The revised pedagogy will help them contextualize statistical concepts and procedures. The numerous examples clearly demonstrate the important points of the methods. New What Will We Learn opening paragraphs set the stage for... more...

Problems that beset Archimedes, Newton, Euler, Cauchy, Gauss, Monge and other greats, ready to challenge today's would-be problem solvers. Among them: How is a sundial constructed? How can you calculate the logarithm of a given number without the use of logarithm table? No advanced math is required. Includes 100 problems with proofs.

This unique book by Stewart Shapiro looks at a range of philosophical issues and positions concerning mathematics in four comprehensive sections. Part I describes questions and issues about mathematics that have motivated philosophers since the beginning of intellectual history. Part II is an historical survey, discussing the role of mathematics in the thought of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. Part III covers the three major... more...

Topics including harmonic division and Apollonian circles, inversive geometry, the hexlet, conic sections, projective geometry, the Golden Section and angle trisection are addressed in a way that brings out the true intellectual excitement inherent in each. Also included: some unsolved problems of modern geometry. Notes. References. 132 line illustrations.

Among the group of physics honors students huddled in 1957 on a Colorado mountain watching Sputnik bisect the heavens, one young scientist was destined, three short years later, to become a key player in America’s own top-secret spy satellite program. One of our era’s most prolific mathematicians, Karl Gustafson was given just two weeks to write the first US spy satellite’s software. The project would fundamentally alter America’s Cold War... more...