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Showing: 1-10 results of 2769

Completely updated and containing two new chapters, this title covers spatial analysis and urban management using graph theory simulation.? Highly practical, the simulation approach allows readers to solve classic problems such as placement of high-speed roads, the capacity of a network, pollution emission control, and more.

This text deals with A1-homotopy theory over a base field, i.e., with the natural homotopy theory associated to the category of smooth varieties over a field in which the affine line is imposed to be contractible. It is a natural sequel to the foundational paper on A1-homotopy theory written together with V. Voevodsky. Inspired by classical results in algebraic topology, we present new techniques, new results and applications related to the properties... more...

This book provides a conceptual and computational framework to study how the nervous system exploits the anatomical properties of limbs to produce mechanical function. The study of the neural control of limbs has historically emphasized the use of optimization to find solutions to the muscle redundancy problem. That is, how does the nervous system select a specific muscle coordination pattern when the many muscles of a limb allow for multiple... more...

``Classical groups'', named so by Hermann Weyl, are groups of matrices or quotients of matrix groups by small normal subgroups. Thus the story begins, as Weyl suggested, with ``Her All-embracing Majesty'', the general linear group $GL_n(V)$ of all invertible linear transformations of a vector space $V$ over a field $F$. All further groups discussed are either subgroups of $GL_n(V)$ or closely related quotient groups. Most of the classical groups... more...

Although contact geometry and topology is briefly discussed in V I Arnol'd's book "Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics "(Springer-Verlag, 1989, 2nd edition), it still remains a domain of research in pure mathematics, e.g. see the recent monograph by H Geiges "An Introduction to Contact Topology" (Cambridge U Press, 2008). Some attempts to use contact geometry in physics were made in the monograph "Contact Geometry and Nonlinear Differential... more...


From the reviews: "These three bulky volumes [EMS 124, 125, 127] […] provide an introduction to this rapidly developing theory. [...] These books can be warmly recommended to every graduate student who wants to become acquainted with this exciting branch of mathematics. Furthermore, they should be on the bookshelf of every researcher of the area." Acta Scientiarum Mathematicarum

by A. Loeb
"Space is not a passive vacuum; it has properties that constrain the patterns that exist within it." Thus does the author set the stage for a broad presentation of and informal introduction to the properties of polyhedra, such as the molecule Buckminsterfullerine. The book has a simple fundamental quality of viewpoint and treatment that gives it an unusually widespread applicability for those who share a common interest in analyzing and designing... more...

The selected contributions in this volume originated at the Sundance conference, which was devoted to discussions of current work in the area of free resolutions. The papers include new research, not otherwise published, and expositions that develop current problems likely to influence future developments in the field.

A phenomenon which appears in nature, or human behavior, can sometimes be explained by saying that a certain potential function is maximized, or minimized. For example, the Hamiltonian mechanics, soapy films, size of an atom, business management, etc. In mathematics, a point where a given function attains an extreme value is called a critical point, or a singular point. The purpose of singularity theory is to explore the properties of singular points... more...

This small book started a profound revolution in the development of mathematical physics, one which has reached many working physicists already, and which stands poised to bring about far-reaching change in the future. At its heart is the use of Clifford algebra to unify otherwise disparate mathematical languages, particularly those of spinors, quaternions, tensors and differential forms. It provides a unified approach covering all... more...