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Showing: 1-10 results of 1299

This text offers a clear, comprehensive, and cutting-edge introduction to the field of information privacy law, with the latest cases and materials exploring issues of emerging technology and information privacy. Extensive background information and authorial guidance provide clear and concise introductions to various areas of law. The Sixth Edition of Information Privacy Law has been revised to include the General Data Protection... more...

Offering a unique perspective that views human rights as the foundation of social justice, Joseph Wronka's groundbreaking Human Rights and Social Justice outlines human rights and social justice concerns as a powerful conceptual framework for policy and practice interventions for the helping and health professions. This highly accessible, interdisciplinary text urges the creation of a human rights culture as a "lived awareness" of... more...

In 262 entries, the set examines landmark pieces of legislation, explaining the historical factors that led to the proposal of each act, looking at the adoption process and assessing each act's impact on American life. All aspects of legislation are covered, including the National Prohibition Act, the Civil Rights Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Housing Act, the Freedom of Information Act and much more.

by Craig, R.
This book argues that traditional complaint-based antidiscrimination laws are inherently inadequate to respond to systemic discrimination in employment. It examines the mechanisms and characteristics of systemic discrimination and the shortcomings of complaint-based laws. Yet these characteristics can also inform employers and government authorities of the kinds of preventive action that help alleviate systemic discrimination at the workplace. In its... more...

The Vinson Court summons students and legal professionals to understand the impact and tensions of Fred Vinson's term as Chief Justice from 1946–1953. Court scholar Michal R. Belknap explores McCarthyism, the Cold War, racial segregation, and capital punishment from the Supreme Court's view. These controversies shaped the most important decision on presidential powers, restrictions on political expression, and a nasty conflict over the... more...


"A book that belongs on the shelf alongside The Gulag Archipelago. -- Kirkus Reviews "A short, haunting and beautifully written book." -- The Wall Street Journal The Gulag was a monstrous network of labor camps that held and killed millions of prisoners from the 1930s to the 1950s. More than half a century after the end of Stalinist terror, the geography of the Gulag has been barely sketched and the number of its victims remains unknown. Has the... more...

The award-winning author of The Eichmann Trial and Denial: Holocaust History on Trial gives us a penetrating and provocative analysis of the hate that will not die, focusing on its current, virulent incarnations on both the political right and left: from white supremacist demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia, to mainstream enablers of antisemitism such as Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn, to a gay pride march in Chicago that expelled a group of... more...

First comprehensive account of how the Internet has impacted life in Iran.

Starting in late 2012, Westerners working in Syria -- journalists and aid workers -- began disappearing without a trace. A year later the world learned they had been taken hostage by the Islamic State. Throughout 2014, all the Europeans came home, first the Spanish, then the French, then an Italian, a German, and a Dane. In August 2014, the Islamic State began executing the Americans -- including journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, followed by... more...

Born to a wealthy family in West Africa around 1770, Omar Ibn Said was abducted and sold into slavery in the United States, where he came to the attention of a prominent North Carolina family after filling “the walls of his room with piteous petitions to be released, all written in the Arabic language,” as one local newspaper reported. Ibn Said soon became a local celebrity, and in 1831 he was asked to write his life... more...