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Showing: 1-10 results of 60272

The definitive inside account of the "extraordinary" (Financial Times) 1MDB scandal, "a true life thriller" (Ben Mezrich) about a "modern Gatsby" who managed to swindle over $5 billion with the aid of Goldman Sachs and others--a "must read" (Booklist) "epic tale" (Publishers Weekly) that exposes the secret nexus of elite wealth, banking, Hollywood, and politics from two award-winning Wall Street Journal reporters. In 2009, with the dust yet to settle... more...

The Scottish Highlanders rank as one of the world's greatest military legends, from their origins in ancient Celtic society through the glory days of battles both for and against the English, to today's trusted NATO soldier on duty in the Persian Gulf and the Balkans. The detailed text is backed up by 150 color and black-and-white illustrations, of which Graham Turner's aerial panorama of the entire battle of Culloden is the most spectacular.

A unique study of the engineering and tools used to create Egyptian monuments • Presents a stone-by-stone analysis of key Egyptian monuments, including the statues of Ramses II and the tunnels of the Serapeum • Reveals that highly refined tools and mega-machines were used in ancient Egypt From the pyramids in the north to the temples in the south, ancient artisans left their marks all over Egypt, unique marks that reveal craftsmanship we would... more...

This is a highly illustrated history, one of the most deadly types of attack aircraft. The torpedo bomber first appeared during the later years of World War One but served their most useful role in the Second World War. The most famous attacks include Taranto, where Fairey Swordfish destroyed the Italian Battle fleet and the infamous surprise attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese.

Culloden Moor is the last and one of the most famous battles in British history. On 16 April 1746 the Duke of Cumberland's government army defeated the Jacobite rebels led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart. In this concise account Stuart Reid, the leading authority on Culloden, sets out in a graphic and easily understood way the movements and deployments of the opposing armies and describes in detail the close and deadly combat that followed. His account... more...


Shedding important new light on the history of the Cold War, Philip Nash tells the story of what the United States gave up to help end the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. By drawing on documents only recently declassified, he shows that one of President Kennedy's compromises with the Soviets involved the removal of Jupiter missiles from Italy and Turkey, an arrangement concealed from both the American public and the rest of the NATO allies.Nash traces... more...

Official publication of the National Maritime Museum's exhibition "Ships, Clocks and Stars: The Quest for Longitude". 300 years ago, amidst growing frustration from the naval community and pressure from the increasing importance of international trade, the British government passed the 1714 Longitude Act. It was an attempt to solve one of the most pressing problems of the age: how to determine a ship's longitude (east-west position) at sea. With... more...

A major new interpretation recasts U.S. history between revolution and civil war, exposing a dramatic reversal in sympathy toward Latin American revolutions. In the early nineteenth century, the United States turned its idealistic gaze southward, imagining a legacy of revolution and republicanism it hoped would dominate the American hemisphere. From pulsing port cities to Midwestern farms and southern plantations, an adolescent nation hailed... more...

Important reading for anyone interested in military history. It has over 340 illustrations, 260 in color.

The fascinating untold story of how the ancients imagined robots and other forms of artificial life―and even invented real automated machines The first robot to walk the earth was a bronze giant called Talos. This wondrous machine was created not by MIT Robotics Lab, but by Hephaestus, the Greek god of invention. More than 2,500 years ago, long before medieval automata, and centuries before technology made self-moving devices... more...