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Showing: 1-10 results of 3279

The magnificent and definitive history of the Eternal City, narrated by a master historian. Why does Rome continue to exert a hold on our imagination? How did the "Caput mundi" come to play such a critical role in the development of Western civilization? Ferdinand Addis addresses these questions by tracing the history of the "Eternal City" told through the dramatic key moments in its history: from the mythic founding of Rome in 753 BC, via such... more...

Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire offers a fascinating holistic look at the practice of ancient Roman medicine. Ido Irsaelowich presents three richly detailed case studies―one focusing on the home and reproduction; another on the army; the last on medical tourism―from the point of view of those on both sides of the patient-healer divide. He explains in depth how people in the classical world became aware of their... more...

First written in response to a JACT survey of over 100 schools, and now endorsed by OCR, this textbook has become a standard resource for students in the UK and for readers across the world who are looking for a clear and thorough introduction to the language of the ancient Greeks. Revised throughout and enhanced by coloured artwork and text features, this edition will support the new OCR specification for Classical Greek (first... more...

Carthage is mainly known as the city that was utterly destroyed by the Romans in 146 BC. This book tells the story about this fascinating city, which for centuries was the center of a far-flung trade network in the Mediterranean. Carthage was founded by Phoenician migrants, who settled in the north of what is now Tunisia, probably in the ninth century BC. The city’s strategic location was key to its success. From here, the Carthaginians could... more...

On a hot and dusty summer's day in 216 BC, the forces of the Carthaginian general Hannibal faced the Roman army in a dramatic encounter at Cannae. Massively outnumbered, the Carthaginians nevertheless won an astonishing victory - one that left more than 50,000 men dead. Gregory Daly's enthralling study considers the reasons that led the two armies to the field of battle, and why each followed the course that they did when they got there. It explores in... more...


The Viking Age was a world very different to our own: a world of violence and magic, swords and slaves. However, there was of course a much more ordinary, everyday side to life. People made things and traded them; they tended crops and livestock; they cooked and looked after their homes; they drank, gambled and went to market. Much has been written about key historical events in the Viking period, but it is time to take a closer look at the day-to-day... more...

During the closing years of the sixteenth century, the Dutch East India Company fast became a political and economic force in Asia, en route to becoming the leading private company in the world by 1660. This definitive volume explores perhaps the most important tool in the company’s trade: its ships. Robert Parthesius here reconstructs the complete shipping activities of the Company through a unique database that charts the movements of even... more...

Theatrocracy is a book about the power of the theatre, how it can affect the people who experience it, and the societies within which it is embedded. It takes as its model the earliest theatrical form we possess complete plays from, the classical Greek theatre of the fifth century BCE, and offers a new approach to understanding how ancient drama operated in performance and became such an influential social, cultural, and political... more...

Living in Rome during the last years of the Republic, Diodorus of Sicily produced the most expansive history of the ancient world that has survived from antiquity--the Bibliotheke. Whereas Diodorus himself has been commonly seen as a "mere copyist" of earlier historical traditions, Kenneth Sacks explores the complexity of his work to reveal a historian with a distinct point of view indicative of his times. Sacks focuses on three... more...

*Includes pictures. *Explains how the Rosetta Stone was deciphered and includes a translation of it. *Includes a bibliography for further reading. Despite the fact Ancient Egyptian history happened so long ago and covered an immense span of time, Egyptologists are able to learn an incredible amount about different periods through reading the surviving texts now preserved in museums throughout the world and in the many temples and tombs in Egypt.... more...