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Showing: 1-10 results of 4711

After Nero's notorious reign, the Romans surely deserved a period of peace and tranquility. Instead, during AD69, three emperors were murdered: Galba, just days into the post, Otho and Vitellius. The same year also saw civil war in Italy, two desperate battles at Cremona and the capture of Rome for Vespasian, which action saw the fourth emperor of the year, but also brought peace.This classic work, now updated and reissued under a new title, is a... more...

A millennium and a half after the end of the period of its unquestioned dominance, Rome remains a significant presence in western culture. This book explores what the empire meant to its subjects.The idea of Rome has long outlived the physical empire that gave it form, and now holds sway over vastly more people and a far greater geographical area than the Romans ever ruled. It continues to shape our understanding of the nature of imperialism, and thus,... more...

The Mediterranean Context of Early Greek History reveals the role of the complex interaction of Mediterranean seafaring and maritime connections in the development of the ancient Greek city-states.Offers fascinating insights into the origins of urbanization in the ancient Mediterranean, including the Greek city-state Based on the most recent research on the ancient Mediterranean Features a novel approach to theories of civilization change - foregoing... more...

In this book, Alexander Parmington combines an examination of space, access control and sculptural themes and placement, to propose how images and texts controlled movement in Classic Maya cities. Using Palenque as a case study, this book analyzes specific building groups and sculptures to provide insight into the hierarchical distribution and use of ritual and administrative space in temple and palace architecture. Identifying which spaces were the... more...

With the growth of postcolonial theory in recent decades, scholarly views of Roman imperialism and colonialism have been evolving and shifting. Much recent discussion of the topic has centered on the ways in which ancient Roman historians consciously or unconsciously denigrated non-Romans. Similarly, contemporary scholars have downplayed Roman elite anxiety about their empire's expansion.In this groundbreaking new work, Eric Adler explores the degree... more...


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Over the past five years, the ,Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History has become the standard reference for world history teaching across the United States. Berkshire's ongoing work with the original group of authors and with dozens of world history teachers (who embraced not only the Encyclopedia but a spin-off classroom publication, This Fleeting World by David Christian) has helped to shape the new, expanded, updated, Written by the world s... more...

Based on the highly acclaimed A History of Western Society, this Brief Edition offers a welcome new approach for today’s classrooms.  A full-color design, extensive learning aids, rich illustration program, and affordable price combine with lively, descriptive writing and compelling first-hand accounts to provide the most vivid account available in a concise edition of what life was like for peoples of the past. 

Based on the highly acclaimed A History of Western Society, this Brief Edition offers a welcome new approach for today’s classrooms.  A full-color design, extensive learning aids, rich illustration program, and affordable price combine with lively, descriptive writing and compelling first-hand accounts to provide the most vivid account available in a concise edition of what life was like for peoples of the past. 

Resistance to malaria. Blue eyes. Lactose tolerance. What do all of these traits have in common? Every one of them has emerged in the last 10,000 years. Scientists have long believed that the “great leap forward” that occurred some 40,000 to 50,000 years ago in Europe marked end of significant biological evolution in humans. In this stunningly original account of our evolutionary history, top scholars Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending reject... more...