Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.

Download links will be available after you disable the ad blocker and reload the page.
Showing: 1-10 results of 1079

Psychology for Actors is a study of modern psychology, specifically designed for the working actor and actor-in-training, that covers discrete areas of psychological theory that actors can apply to their creative process to form and connect with characters. The book investigates many post-Stanislavsky ideas about human psychology from some of the twentieth century’s most brilliant minds – from Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung to... more...

The idea of the tragic has permeated Western culture for millennia, and has been expressed theatrically since the time of the ancient Greeks. However, it was in the Europe of the twentieth century – one of the most violent periods of human history – that the tragic form significantly developed. ‘Modern European Tragedy’ examines the consciousness of this era, drawing a picture of the development of the tragic through an in-depth... more...

Greek Tragedies, Volume I contains Aeschylus’s “Agamemnon,” translated by Richmond Lattimore; Aeschylus’s “Prometheus Bound,” translated by David Grene; Sophocles’s “Oedipus the King,” translated by David Grene; Sophocles’s “Antigone,” translated by Elizabeth Wyckoff; and Euripides’s “Hippolytus,” translated by David Grene.   Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous... more...

Stanislavsky in Practice focuses on the course of study pursued today by aspiring actors in Russia and on the philosophy that informs this curriculum. It draws on extensive observation during the academic year 2000-2001 of the actor training program of the St. Petersburg State Academy of Theatre Arts (SPGATI), one of the three most prestigious theatrical institutes in Russia, and on interviews of a wide array of individuals in the Academy. Although the... more...

The fifteen original essays in Staging Philosophy make useful connections between the discipline of philosophy and the fields of theater and performance and use these insights to develop new theories about theater. Each of the contributors—leading scholars in the fields of performance and philosophy—breaks new ground, presents new arguments, and offers new theories that will pave the way for future scholarship.... more...


Tarkovsky's diaries were widely reviewed and considered to be a valuable addition to the Tarkovsky canon. The diaries cover his work in the Soviet Union and the increasing difficulties he encountered there followed by his exile in Europe. They are professional and personal: thoughts on film sit alongside household chores, notes about friends and family. The diaries have been translated by Kitty Hunter-Blair. Andrey Tarkovsky was born in the Soviet... more...

Crannell's text offers students a chance to both learn and do. First, students read to discover how their vocal apparatus works and find ways to recognize a variety of speech patterns. Then, as they practice with the numerous and varied exercises provided in the text, they develop the skills needed for personal and professional success.

Escape Artist—based on Glenn Lovell’s extensive interviews with John Sturges, his wife and children, and numerous stars including Clint Eastwood, Robert Duvall, and Jane Russell—is the first biography of the director of such acclaimed films as The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and Bad Day at Black Rock. Lovell examines Sturges’s childhood in California during the Great Depression; his apprenticeship in the editing department of RKO... more...

Understanding Sam Shepard investigates the notoriously complex and confusing dramatic world of Sam Shepard, one of America's most prolific, thoughtful, and challenging contemporary playwrights. During his nearly fifty-year career as a writer, actor, director, and producer, Shepard has consistently focused his work on the ever-changing American cultural landscape. James A. Crank's comprehensive study of Shepard offers scholars and students of the... more...

Theatrocracy is a book about the power of the theatre, how it can affect the people who experience it, and the societies within which it is embedded. It takes as its model the earliest theatrical form we possess complete plays from, the classical Greek theatre of the fifth century BCE, and offers a new approach to understanding how ancient drama operated in performance and became such an influential social, cultural, and political... more...