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Showing: 1-10 results of 910

Prior to 1914, Germany dominated the worldwide production of synthetic organic dyes and pharmaceuticals like aspirin. When World War I disrupted the supply of German chemicals to the United States, American entrepreneurs responded to the shortages and high prices by trying to manufacture chemicals domestically. Learning the complex science and industry, however, posed a serious challenge. This book explains how the United States built a synthetic... more...

Smartphones have to be made someplace, and that place is China. In just five years, a company names Xiaomi (which means "little rice" in Mandarin) has grown into the most valuable startup ever, becoming the third largest manufacturer of smartphones, behind only Samsung and Apple. China is now both the world's largest producer and consumer of a little device that brings the entire globe to its user's fingertips. How has this changed the... more...

The idea of workers owning the businesses where they work is not new.  In America’s early years, Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison believed that the best economic plan for the Republic was for citizens to have some ownership stake in the land, which was the main form of productive capital. This book traces the development of that share idea in American history and brings its message to today's economy, where business... more...

In the years prior to World War I, George Holt Thomas was an active supporter of aviation development and a promoter of its military potential. The pace of development saw him employing a young and talented aircraft designer by the name of Geoffrey de Havilland, and the aircraft they produced went on to make history. In this book, the author tells the story of Airco, the Aircraft Manufacturing Company, and of its range of products including the D.H.4... more...

Gentlemen Bankers investigates the social and economic circles of one of America’s most renowned and influential financiers to uncover how the Morgan family’s power and prestige stemmed from its unique position within a network of local and international relationships. At the turn of the twentieth century, private banking was a personal enterprise in which business relationships were a statement of identity and reputation. In an... more...



THE REVOLUTIONARY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BEHIND ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL COMPANIES OF OUR TIME   In 1961, Charles Koch joined his father’s Wichita-based company, then valued at $21 million. Six years later, he was named chairman of the board and CEO of Koch Industries, Inc. Today, Koch Industries’ estimated worth is $100 billion -- making it one of the largest private companies in the world. Koch exceeds the S&P 500’s five-decade growth by... more...

"Makes a reader feel like a time traveler plopped down among men who were by turns vicious and visionary."--The Christian Science Monitor The modern American economy was the creation of four men: Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan. They were the giants of the Gilded Age, a moment of riotous growth that established America as the richest, most inventive, and most productive country on the planet.... more...

Politics is nothing new to Washington, D.C., even in the arena marked with base paths and outfield grass. The stadium for the expansion Washington Nationals baseball team cost over $600 million and while opponents decried the waste of taxpayer money, supporters promised the stadium would stimulate economic development. Land swaps, closed-door deals, and valuable parking-lot strategies were as complex as any game plan employed on the diamond. The... more...

Corporate social disclosure (CSD), as an important branch in social accounting, has been widely examined since the 1970s. During that time, managers were under pressure to disclose the wider consequences that corporate activities may have on the environment, human resources and consumer policies. Rapid globalization in the 1980s and 1990s has forced corporations to realize that their operations and activities are not in a vacuum but... more...