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Showing: 1-10 results of 982

On January 5, 1845, the Prussian cultural minister received a request by a group of six young men to form a new Physical Society in Berlin. In fields from thermodynamics, mechanics, and electromagnetism to animal electricity, ophthalmology, and psychophysics, members of this small but growing group—which soon included Emil Du Bois-Reymond, Ernst Brücke, Werner Siemens, and Hermann von Helmholtz—established leading positions in what... more...

On the Eve of the AI era, it is perfect timing to read an AI expert's autobiography, to learn about Dr. Kai-Fu Lee, the author of "AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley & the New World," also available on Amazon. This is the first and only authorized English version of Dr. Lee's autobiography. The original Chinese version of the sold 1.2 million copies in China in 2009 as a best seller of the year over there. Evidently, this autobiography is full... more...

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

From the bestselling author of E=mc2, a brisk, accessible biography of Albert Einstein that reveals the genius and hubris of the titan of modern physics. Widely considered the greatest genius of all time, Albert Einstein revolutionized our understanding of the cosmos with his general theory of relativity and helped to lead us into the atomic age. Yet in the final decades of his life he was also ignored by most working scientists, his... more...

The Journal of Fluorescence's first Who's Who directory is to publish the names, contact details, specialty keywords and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. In addition the directory will provide company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence related products. Nothing like this has been published before for the Fluorescence field. 



The death of Dr. David Kelly in 2003 is one of the strangest events in recent British history. This scrupulous scientist, an expert on weapons of mass destruction, was caught up in the rush to war in Iraq. He felt under pressure from those around Tony Blair to provide evidence that Saddam Hussein was producing weapons of mass destruction. Kelly seemed to have tipped into sudden depression when he was outed as a source... more...

The incredible true story of life as a London firefighter. What is it really like to be a firefighter? How does it feel to respond to an emergency call, to know that someone's life hangs in the balance and every second is critical? What is it like to fight a fire, to battle through the heat and the smoke, to put your own life in danger to save others? How elated do you feel to rescue survivors, to reunite families, and how devastating is... more...

Some readers will be drawn to this survey of traditional Chinese science by the idea that humanity has evolved more than one tradition of natural science that deserves to be taken seriously as a study in itself. Others will wish to explore the possibility that by reconstructing and imaginatively adopting the viewpoint of so different a culture, they might become more critical in judging what aspects of the West's Scientific Revolution grew out of... more...

One of the most fascinating scientific detective stories of the last fifty years, an exciting quest for a new form of matter. The Second Kind of Impossible reads like James Gleick’s Chaos combined with an Indiana Jones adventure. When leading Princeton physicist Paul Steinhardt began working in the 1980s, scientists thought they knew all the conceivable forms of matter. The Second Kind of Impossible is the story of Steinhardt’s... more...