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Showing: 1-10 results of 489

It is widely accepted that the Stuart kings, Charles II and James II, had an interest in the navy and the sea. Nonetheless, the major naval developments during their reigns--developments that effectively turned the Royal Navy into a permanent, professional fighting force--have traditionally been attributed to Samuel Pepys. Kings of the Sea presents a provocative new theory: that the creation of the proper "Royal Navy" was, in fact, due... more...

Meals and memories from Princess Diana's personal chef. All families have their favorite foods?including the House of Windsor. Darren McGrady, personal chef to Princess Diana and chef to the royal family for fifteen years, has collected more than 100 recipes in Eating Royally and behind-the-scenes stories that offer insight into the royal family's lives. From hearty cooking to gourmet eating, these dishes will impress even the most... more...

Caesar Augustus’ story, one of the most riveting in western history, is filled with drama and contradiction, risky gambles and unexpected success. He began as a teenage warlord, whose only claim to power was as the heir of the murdered Julius Caesar. Mark Antony dubbed him “a boy who owes everything to a name,” but in the years to come the youth outmaneuvered all the older and more experienced politicians and was the last man... more...

One of the most popular and controversial Chinese history books ever written, China under the Empress Dowager is also one of the best. Authors Bland and Backhouse take you inside the Forbidden City during the reign of Empress Dowager Cixi (1861-1908), a world of power-thirsty eunuchs, concubines and Mandarins, intrigue, bitter antagonism and ruthless reprisals. The book was unique for its time in its reliance on Chinese source materials, some of which... more...

Of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays, fifteen include queens. This collection gives these characters their due as powerful early modern women and agents of change, bringing together new perspectives from scholars of literature, history, theater, and the fine arts. Essays span Shakespeare’s career and cover a range of famous and lesser-known queens, from the furious Margaret of Anjou in the Henry VI plays to the quietly powerful Hermione in The... more...


History tells us that Edward II died at Berkeley Castle in 1327 in agony, with a red-hot poker inserted inside him. This is one of the most famous and lurid tales in all of English history. But is it true? Much evidence suggests that Edward did not die at Berkeley Castle at all, but was still alive years after his supposed death. Medieval historian Kathryn Warner explores in detail Edward’s downfall and forced abdication in 1326-1327,... more...

The secret history of Eleanor Talbot, the woman at the heart of the controversy surrounding Richard III   Offering a solution to one of England's great mysteries, this book argues that Eleanor Talbot was married to Edward IV, and that therefore Edward’s subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Woodville was bigamous, making her children illegitimate. When Edward IV died in... more...

Thrust into power in the midst of the bloodiest conflict Europe had ever experienced, Amalia Elisabeth fought to save her country, her Calvinist church, and her children’s inheritance. Tryntje Helfferich’s vivid portrait reveals how this unique and embattled ruler used her diplomatic gifts to play the great powers of Europe against one another during the Thirty Years War, while raising one of the most powerful and effective fighting... more...

One of the greatest--and most enigmatic--Roman emperors, Hadrian stabilized the imperial borders, established peace throughout the empire, patronized the arts, and built an architectural legacy that lasts to this day: the great villa at Tivoli, the domed wonder of the Pantheon, and the eponymous wall that stretches across Britain. Yet the story of his reign is also a tale of intrigue, domestic discord, and murder. In Following Hadrian, Elizabeth... more...

China was the most advanced country in the world when Huizong ascended the throne in 1100 CE. In his eventful twenty-six-year reign, the artistically gifted emperor guided the Song Dynasty toward cultural greatness. Yet Huizong would be known to posterity as a political failure who lost the throne to Jurchen invaders and died their prisoner. The first comprehensive English-language biography of this important monarch, Emperor Huizong... more...