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Showing: 1-10 results of 1055

The career of Günter Kupetz reflects the heydey of German design in the 1950s and 1960s. Kupetz designed over a thousand products, including metal ware, glass, jewelry, packaging, furniture, and machines. This first comprehensive survey presents Kupetz's work in context and demonstrates how he understood the design of anonymous, mass-produced items as a social task that demanded the maximum possible quality. Günter Kupetz is an essential... more...

Illuminating Leonardo opens the new series Leonardo Studies with a tribute to Professor Carlo Pedretti, the most important Leonardo scholar of our time, with a wide-ranging overview of current Leonardo scholarship from the most renowned Leonardo scholars and young researchers. Though no single book could provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of Leonardo studies, after reading this collection of short essays cover-to-cover, the reader... more...

Travel + Sketching = Inspiration When we travel, we don't want to follow the same itinerary as everyone who's come before us. We want to feel like explorers, adventurers in undiscovered territory. And that's exactly what sketching can bring to the travel experience. An Illustrated Journey captures the world through the eyes of 40 talented artists, illustrators and designers. You'll experience the wonder of seeing familiar sights... more...

Bradford Collins has assembled here a collection of twelve essays that demonstrates, through the interpretation of a single work of art, the abundance and complexity of methodological approaches now available to art historians. Focusing on Manet's A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, each contributor applies to it a different methodology, ranging from the more traditional to the newer, including feminism, Marxism, Lacanian psychoanalysis, and... more...

English painter John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) communicates his aesthetic vision through his use of color. Throughout his career, he experimented with color as an element with seemingly spatial qualities. His works have an unusual formalism--figures and settings often appear not merely realistic but somewhat hyperreal. Yet paradoxically Waterhouse's works border on the abstract, prioritizing chromatic features over content. They invite us to focus... more...


The Description for this book, The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and His Followers, will be forthcoming.

Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890) believed that drawing was “the root of everything.” A self-taught artist, he succeeded, between 1881 and 1890, in developing an inimitable graphic style. This book traces the artist’s successive triumphs as a draftsman, first in the Netherlands and later in France, highlighting the diversity of his technical invention and the striking continuity of his vision. Given the pivotal role drawings played in... more...

A milling district along the Mississippi River. A railroad bridge on Washington Avenue. Jim's Hamburgers in Duluth. A spiral staircase in the Schmidt Brewery. These are the spaces that capture the moods of Minnesota's prewar era. These are the everyday places where ordinary people lived and worked. These are the images that show us the remnants of a city's past. In The Quiet Hours, Mike Melman records a vanishing era of Minnesota's towns and cities... more...

For almost a century, W. A. Bentley caught and photographed thousands of snowflakes in his workshop at Jericho, Vermont, and made available to scientists and art instructors samples of his remarkable work. His painstakingly prepared images were remarkable revelations of nature's diversity in uniformity: no two snowflakes are exactly alike, but all are based on a common hexagon.... more...

Now celebrated as one of the great painters of the Renaissance, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio fled Rome in 1606 to escape retribution for killing a man in a brawl. Three years later he was in Naples, where he painted The Seven Acts of Mercy. A year later he died at the age of thirty-eight under mysterious circumstances. Exploring Caravaggio's singular masterwork, in The Guardian of Mercy Terence Ward offers an incredible narrative... more...