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Showing: 11-20 results of 1055

There are few couples in the history of 20th-century American art and culture more prominent than Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986) and Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946). Between 1915, when they first began to write to each other, and 1946, when Stieglitz died, O'Keeffe and Stieglitz exchanged over 5,000 letters (more than 25,000 pages) that describe their daily lives in profoundly rich detail. This long-awaited volume features some 650... more...

Major monograph which was published on the occasion of the exhibition "Garry Winogrand" held at The Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1988. The best book on Garry Winogrand.

Next to Yosemite and the High Sierra, the Southwest was closest to Ansel Adams' heart. It was there, in the early 1930s, that he met photographer Paul Strand and decided to make photography his life's work. In his words, "wherever one goes in the Southwest one encounters magic, strength, and beauty." In The Grand Canyon and the Southwest, Adam's little known images of the Grand Canyon make up roughly one quarter of the photographs selected and edited... more...

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) documented rural poverty for the federal Resettlement Administration and Farm Security Administration from 1935 to 1939. Her powerful images--from migrant workers in California fleeing the "dustbowl," to struggling Southern sharecroppers-- became icons of the era. She later photographed Japanese Americans in internment camps during World War II and traveled throughout Europe and Asia. This book presents 42 of the greatest... more...

by Joe Fig
What was your first artwork to receive recognition? What materials do you use, and how did they come into your practice? What advice would you give a young artist just starting out?  Joe Fig asked a wide range of celebrated artists these and many other questions during the illuminating studio visits documented in Inside the Artist's Studio--the follow-up to his acclaimed 2009 book, Inside the Painter's Studio. In this remarkable collection,... more...


A beautiful retrospective of the work of one of the twentieth century’s most influential and innovative watercolorists: John Blockley.   Self-taught artist John Blockley produced work that has always been experimental and progressive: his highly textured style was well ahead of his time and still hugely influential. This beautiful survey of his work, comprising watercolors, pastels, and acrylics, brings together his finest... more...

A daring story of imprisonment and escape under the Nazi regime and a moving and engrossing symbol of resilience and integrity. The French painter Jean Hélion’s unique and deeply moving account of his experiences in Nazi prisoner of war camps prefigures the even darker stories that would emerge from the concentration camps. This serious adventure tale begins with Hélion’s infantry platoon fleeing from the German army and... more...

A veteran art critic helps us make sense of modern and contemporary art The landscape of contemporary art has changed dramatically during the last hundred years: from Malevich's 1915 painting of a single black square and Duchamp's 1917 signed porcelain urinal to Jackson Pollock's midcentury "drip" paintings; Chris Burden's "Shoot" (1971), in which the artist was voluntarily shot in the arm with a rifle; Urs Fischer's "You"... more...

An innovative analysis of Simone Forti's interdisciplinary art, viewing her influential 1960s “dance constructions” as negotiating the aesthetic strategies of John Cage and Anna Halprin. Simone Forti's art developed within the overlapping circles of New York City's advanced visual art, dance, and music of the early 1960s. Her “dance constructions” and related works of the 1960s were important for both visual art and dance of... more...

Pablo Picasso called Françoise Gilot “The Woman Who Says No.” Tiny, talented, and feisty, and an accomplished artist in her own right, Gilot left Picasso after a ten-year relationship, the only woman to escape his intense attentions unscathed. From 2012 to 2014, German journalist and author Malte Herwig dropped by her ateliers in Paris and New York to chat with her about life, love, and art. She shared trenchant observations, her... more...