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by Tacitus
Book 11, the first of the later books of the Annals to survive, narrates two years in the reign of Claudius, AD 47-8. While Claudius is busy with the duties of his censorship, his wife Messalina is having a very public love affair with the young aristocrat Silius that eventually ruins her. In a book that also treats German, eastern, and other Roman internal affairs, a third of the surviving narrative is devoted to the destruction of Messalina. Here we... more...

by Tacitus
A compelling new translation of a vital account of Roman history With clarity and vivid intensity, Tacitus's Annals recounts the pivotal events in Roman history from the years shortly before the death of Augustus to the death of Nero in 68 AD, including the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero, and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies, and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite... more...

by Tacitus
His last work, regarded by many as the greatest work of contemporary scholarship, Tacitus' The Annals of Imperial Rome recount with depth and insight the history of the Roman Empire during the first century A.D. This Penguin Classics edition is translated with an introduction by Michael Grant. Tacitus' Annals of Imperial Rome recount the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus up to the death of Nero in AD 68. With... more...

by Tacitus
A newly revised edition of two seminal works on Imperial Rome Undeniably one of Rome's most important historians, Tacitus was also one of its most gifted. The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola-the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus's respected father-in-law-and the first known detailed portrayal of the British Isles. In the Germania, Tacitus focuses on the warlike German tribes beyond the Rhine, often... more...

by Tacitus
In AD 68, Nero?s suicide marked the end of the first dynasty of imperial Rome. The following year was one of drama and danger, with four emperors?Galba, Otho, Vitellius, and Vespasian? emerging in succession. Based on authoritative sources, The Histories vividly recounts the details of the ?long but single year? of revolution that brought the Roman empire to the brink of collapse.