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At the root of inequality, unemployment, and populism are radical changes in the world economy. Digital technology is allowing talented foreigners to telecommute into our workplaces and compete for service and professional jobs. Instant machine translation is melting language barriers, so the ranks of these "tele-migrants" will soon include almost every educated person in the world. Computing power is dissolving humans' monopoly on thinking, enabling... more...

The debate about the expansion of the regional integration of Europe is set to dominate the European Union's (EU's) policy agenda in the coming years. While the countries of Central and Eastern Europe may aspire to EU membership only in the long term, four EFTA countries have already submitted formal applications, and are aiming for membership by the mid-1990s. This book, from the Centre for Economic Policy Research, addresses this imminent expansion,... more...

Between 1820 and 1990, the share of world income going to today’s wealthy nations soared from twenty percent to almost seventy. Since then, that share has plummeted to where it was in 1900. As Richard Baldwin explains, this reversal of fortune reflects a new age of globalization that is drastically different from the old. In the 1800s, globalization leaped forward when steam power and international peace lowered the costs of moving... more...