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Showing: 1-10 results of 47

Following the Revolution in 1789, members of the aristocracy were increasingly persecuted, and many of them fled abroad. These exiles became known collectively as 'émigrés', and despite initial confusions and indecision, many of them were taken into British service. This fine text by René Chartrand examines the organisation, uniforms and insignia of the Émigré troops in British service from 1793 to 1802, accompanied by plenty of illustrations... more...

Osprey's examination of the Mexican Army of Santa Anna, from 1821 to 1848. Detailed information on the Mexican Army which fought the Texans in the Battle of the Alamo (1836) and the US Army in its first important foreign war ten years later, is notoriously elusive. In this ground-breaking book an internationally respected military historian presents a mass of new information from Mexican archives and a variety of other contemporary sources.... more...

Canada was the first Commonwealth country to send troops to Britain in 1939. During 1939-45 hundreds of thousands of Canadians - more than 40 per cent of the male population between the ages of 18 and 45, and virtually all of them volunteers - enlisted. Canadians fought with tragic courage at Hong Kong and Dieppe; with growing strength and confidence in Sicily, Italy and Normandy; and finally provided an entire Army for the liberation of NW Europe.... more...

Two centuries ago, the West Indies were a booming set of islands where vast fortunes were made. By the late 1790s, the West Indies attracted four-fifths of British overseas capital investments and provided over one-eight of the government's £31.5 million total net revenue to the Treasury. These figures explain the tremendous numbers of naval and military forces deployed to protect these valuable Caribbean territories during the French Revolutionary... more...

Osprey's examination of one of the key campaigns of the French and Indian War (1754-1763). On 9 July 1755 amid the wilderness of North America, Britain suffered one of the most humiliating defeats in her history. General Braddock’s army, a mixture of British regulars and American militia, was shattered, losing over 900 men from a force of 1,300. Braddock was killed and the remnants of his army rescued by his aide, Colonel George Washington. The... more...


The second in a two-volume study of forts in colonial North America, this title offers a detailed look at various types of fortifications built between the times of the earliest British settlements in North America in the late 16th century until the end of the Seven Years War, when France ceded New France to Britain. With photographs of these sites as they are today, specially-commissioned artwork depicting the forts in their original uses and detailed... more...

Osprey's examination of the first of Sir Arthur Wellesley's string of victories in the Peninsular War (1807-1814). On 2 August 1808, a British army of 14,000 men began landing north of Lisbon under the command of Sir Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington. They were coming to assist the Portuguese, Britain's oldest ally, to liberate their country from its French occupiers. Within a month Wellesley was to win two victories over the French... more...

This Osprey title details the gruelling Bussaco campaign of the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815), as French attempts to subdue Portugal reached their climax. By 1810, Napoleon reigned supreme over most of continental Europe. But the Iberian Peninsula remained unsubdued, particularly Portugal, which continued to resist. Napoleon ordered Marshal Masséna to crush this resistance with the Army of Portugal. Greatly strengthened, Masséna's army would... more...

On account of long-standing tradition as well as sheer numbers, the importance of foreign regiments in the French army had become considerable by the time of Louis XV. Since the Middle Ages, the rulers of France had called upon mercenaries from various neighbouring nations to form units which were often among the finest in the army. In this third of five volumes covering the army of Louis XV [Men-at-Arms 296, 302, 304, 308 & 313], René Chartrand... more...

In Louis XV's army the classification of 'French' infantry denoted troops recruited from men born and raised in France. These regiments were called, naturally enough, infanterie francaise as opposed to the mercenary 'foreign' infantry recruited elsewhere. Making up the bulk of the army, all officers and men were to be of the Roman Catholic faith, the official state religion. Regimental recruiting parties went to towns and villages looking for likely... more...