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Showing: 1-10 results of 13

This two-volume textbook Comprehensive Mathematics for  Computer Scientists is a self-contained comprehensive presentation of mathematics including sets, numbers, graphs, algebra, logic, grammars, machines, linear geometry, calculus, ODEs, and special themes such as neural networks, Fourier theory, wavelets, numerical issues, statistics, categories, and manifolds. The concept framework is streamlined but defining and proving virtually everything.... more...

This second volume of a comprehensive tour through mathematical core subjects for computer scientists completes the ?rst volume in two - gards: Part III ?rst adds topology, di?erential, and integral calculus to the t- ics of sets, graphs, algebra, formal logic, machines, and linear geometry, of volume 1. With this spectrum of fundamentals in mathematical e- cation, young professionals should be able to successfully attack more involved subjects, which... more...

This is the fourth volume of the second edition of the now classic book “The Topos of Music”. The author presents appendices with background material on sound and auditory physiology; mathematical basics such as sets, relations, transformations, algebraic geometry, and categories; complements in physics, including a discussion on string theory; and tables with chord classes and modulation steps.

This is the second volume of the second edition of the now classic book “The Topos of Music”. The author explains his theory of musical performance, developed in the language of differential geometry, introducing performance vector fields that generalize tempo and intonation. The author also shows how Rubato, a software platform for composition, analysis, and performance, allows an experimental evaluation of principles of expressive... more...

This textbook is a first introduction to mathematics for music theorists, covering basic topics such as sets and functions, universal properties, numbers and recursion, graphs, groups, rings, matrices and modules, continuity, calculus, and gestures. It approaches these abstract themes in a new way: Every concept or theorem is motivated and illustrated by examples from music theory (such as harmony, counterpoint, tuning), composition... more...


This book explains music’s comprehensive ontology, its way of existence and processing, as specified in its compact characterization: music embodies meaningful communication and mediates physically between its emotional and mental layers. The book unfolds in a basic discourse in everyday language that is accessible to everybody who wants to understand what this topic is about. Musical ontology is delayed in its fundamental... more...

The mathematical theory of counterpoint was originally aimed at simulating the composition rules described in Johann Joseph Fux’s Gradus ad Parnassum. It soon became apparent that the algebraic apparatus used in this model could also serve to define entirely new systems of rules for composition, generated by new choices of consonances and dissonances, which in turn lead to new restrictions governing the succession of intervals.... more...

The book opens with a short introduction to Indian music, in particular classical Hindustani music, followed by a chapter on the role of statistics in computational musicology. The authors then show how to analyze musical structure using Rubato, the music software package for statistical analysis, in particular addressing modeling, melodic similarity and lengths, and entropy analysis; they then show how to analyze musical performance.... more...

Let’s try to play the music and not the background. Ornette Coleman, liner notes of the LP “Free Jazz” [20] WhenIbegantocreateacourseonfreejazz,theriskofsuchanenterprise was immediately apparent: I knew that Cecil Taylor had failed to teach such a matter, and that for other, more academic instructors, the topic was still a sort of outlandish adventure. To be clear, we are not talking about tea- ing improvisation here—a di?erent, and also... more...

Contains all the mathematics that computer scientists need to know in one place.