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Western Ecuador is famed for its astonishingly diverse birdlife, from colorful hummingbirds and outrageous toucans to more difficult groups like raptors, flycatchers, and ovenbirds. Here is the ultimate photographic guide to the spectacular birds of this region. Featuring nearly 1,500 stunning color photos of 946 species, this richly detailed and taxonomically sophisticated field guide will help you with even the toughest identification... more...

Birds are the life and soul of any garden, whatever its size or location, and one thing can be guaranteed: if food is on offer, birds will visit. With this in mind, Make Your Own Bird Food brings you some of the most popular and successful bird food recipes ever served up, ensuring your bird feeder or table will be the toast of avian gourmet for years to come. With 40 quick, easy and cheap meal ideas and a range of useful tips... more...

Traveling to 41 countries in 2015 with a backpack and binoculars, Noah Strycker became the first person to see more than half the world’s 10,000 species of birds in one year. In 2015, Noah Strycker set himself a lofty goal: to become the first person to see half the world’s birds in one year. For 365 days, with a backpack, binoculars, and a series of one-way... more...

North Carolina harbors an incredible diversity of habitats that provide food and shelter for more than 440 bird species throughout the year, making the state a destination for birders and nature lovers. The North Carolina Birding Trail is a driving trail linking birders and tourists with great birding sites across the state and the local communities in which they are found. The first of three regional guides, the Coastal Plain Trail Guide presents 102... more...

A Nature-Friendly Way to Attract and House Birds Birdhouses are a favorite project among woodworkers. Made of inexpensive materials, they are quick to build and a pleasure for the whole neighborhood. Easy to Build Birdhouses includes 26 fun projects for woodworkers of all skill levels. Part 1 talks about construction basics, wood grain, doors and access, proper drainage and ventilation, interiors, materials and... more...


In 1894, a lighthouse keeper named David Lyall arrived on Stephens Island off New Zealand with a cat named Tibbles. In just over a year, the Stephens Island Wren, a rare bird endemic to the island, was rendered extinct. Mounting scientific evidence confirms what many conservationists have suspected for some time―that in the United States alone, free-ranging cats are killing birds and other animals by the billions. Equally alarming... more...

The definitive groundbreaking book on the relationship between birds and humankind, with contributions from more than 600 bird enthusiasts from all over the world   Part natural history and part cultural study, this book describes and maps the entire spectrum of human engagements with birds, drawing in themes of history, literature, art, cuisine, language, lore, politics, and the environment. Vast in both scope and... more...

You don't have to be a dedicated birdwatcher to be a bird lover. Millions of us love the sight and sound of them. And yet most of us know very little about their remarkable behaviour, incredible diversity and the story of their evolution. How do migrating birds know where to go? Are birds really descended from dinosaurs? How do birds have sex? This handbook sets about answering every interesting question there is to ask about birds. There... more...

This delightful and dramatic collection of portraits reveals birds of prey as we never experience them: intimate and up close, photographed in Traer Scott's signature style. Seventy spectacular color photos present twenty-five different species, from the familiar to the exotic and endangered: hawks, owls, falcons, a bald eagle, kestrels, a Mississippi Kite, a turkey vulture, and more. Joining their elders are a fluffy baby vulture and adorable baby and... more...

Emily Dickinson’s poem “Split the Lark” refers to the “scarlet experiment” by which scientists destroy a bird in order to learn more about it. Indeed, humans have killed hundreds of millions of birds—for science, fashion, curiosity, and myriad other reasons. In the United States alone, seven species of birds are now extinct and another ninety-three are endangered. Conversely, the U.S. conservation movement has made... more...