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Before the drought of the early twenty-first century, the dry benchmark in the American plains was the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. But in this eye-opening work, Kevin Z. Sweeney reveals that the Dust Bowl was only one cycle in a series of droughts on the U.S. southern plains. Reinterpreting our nation’s nineteenth-century history through paleoclimatological data and firsthand accounts of four dry periods in the 1800s, Prelude to the... more...

This rereading of the history of American westward expansion examines the destruction of Native American cultures as a successful campaign of "counterinsurgency." Paramilitary figures such as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett "opened the West" and frontiersmen infiltrated the enemy, learning Indian tactics and launching "search and destroy" missions. Conventional military force was a key component but the interchange between militia, regular soldiers,... more...

Culled from a variety of sources, the rare photographs, documents, paintings, and drawings in this history of America's famous pyramid builders answers some of the most puzzling questions about the Mayan civilization. Original.

This volume is one of a series by Time-Life Books that chronicles the history and culture of the Native Americans. The four main chapters - Guardians of the People's Trust ~ Defenders of the Homelands ~ Champions of the Apache Cause ~ Patriots in the Western Wars - and the several interspersed brief essays, are all profusely illustrated with color and black & white photographs, as well as drawings and maps.

In a powerful evocation of the spirit and drama of the American West, the harrowing story of the feud that ignited the Apache Wars. In February 1861, the twelve-year-old son of Arizona rancher John Ward was kidnapped by Apaches. Ward followed their trail and reported the incident to patrols at Fort Buchanan, blaming a band of Chiricahuas led by the infamous warrior Cochise. Though Ward had no proof that Cochise had kidnapped his son, Lt. George... more...


From the tombs of the elite to the graves of commoners, mortuary remains offer rich insights into Classic Maya society. In Mortuary Landscapes of the Classic Maya: Rituals of Body and Soul, the anthropological archaeologist and bioarchaeologist Andrew K. Scherer explores the broad range of burial practices among the Maya of the Classic period (AD 250–900), integrating information gleaned from his own fieldwork with insights from the... more...

The epic life story of the Native American holy man who has inspired millions around the world Black Elk, the Native American holy man, is known to millions of readers around the world from his 1932 testimonial Black Elk Speaks. Adapted by the poet John G. Neihardt from a series of interviews with Black Elk and other elders at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, Black Elk Speaks is one of the most widely read and admired... more...

The Traditional Bowyer's Bible series includes three essential volumes filled with history, humor, and practical advice. Invaluable information for anyone interested in the age-old lure of archery.

In February of 1897 a family of six--four generations, including twin infant sons and their aged great-grandmother--was brutally murdered in rural North Dakota. The weapons used were a shotgun, an axe, a pitchfork, a spade, and a club. Several Dakota Indians from the nearby Standing Rock reservation were arrested, and one was tried, pronounced guilty and sentenced to be hanged. The conviction was reversed by the state supreme court, which ordered a new... more...

Since its violent dissolution in 1521, the Aztec Empire of Mexico has continually intrigued us. Recent discoveries resulting from the excavation of the Templo Mayor in the heart of Mexico City have taught us even more about this fascinating culture. The increasing recognition that the achievements of Mesoamerican civilizations were among the most sophisticated of the ancient world has led to a demand for introductions to the basic methods and theories... more...