Showing: 1-10 results of 516

They Got It Wrong: History exposes historical fallacies and explains how they came to be, as far back as the Roman Empire all the way up to World War II. They Got It Wrong: History exposes historical fallacies around the globe from the Roman Empire to World War II. There are countless twisted, sanitized tales that have become entrenched in popular belief but are really now more than warped reflections of the truth—or flat out lies. Author Emma... more...

The Oral History Reader edited by Robert Perks and Alistair Thomson, is an international anthology of the key writings about the theory, method and use of oral history. Arranged in five thematic sections, The Oral History Reader details issues in the theory and practice of oral history. The collection covers key debates in the postwar development of oral history including: * problems posed by interviewing * discussions of... more...


In 2009, Palestinians commemorated the 60th anniversary of the Nakba - the most traumatic catastrophe that ever befell them. The book explores ways of remembering and commemorating the Nakba, dealing with the issue within the context of Palestinian oral history, "social history from below," narratives of memory, and the formation of collective identity. Masalha argues that to write more truthfully about the Nakba is not just to practice... more...

Surveying the history, latest developments and potential future directions of contemporary analytic philosophy, this is an essential one-volume reference guide for all those working in the field. The Bloomsbury Companion to Analytic Philosophy brings together a team of internationally renowned scholars to explore all the major areas of inquiry, key concepts and most important thinkers in the analytic tradition. Topics covered... more...


This unique and detailed analysis provides the first accessible and comprehensive introduction to the origins, development, methodology of microhistory – one of the most significant innovations in historical scholarship to have emerged in the last few decades. The introduction guides the reader through the best-known example of microstoria, The Cheese and the Worms by Carlo Ginzburg, and explains the benefits of studying an event,... more...

This book examines recent cinematic representations of the traumatic legacies of national and international events and processes. Whilst not ignoring European and Hollywood cinema, it includes studies of films about countries which have been less well-represented in cinematic trauma studies, including Australia, Rwanda, Chile and Iran. Each essay establishes national and international contexts that are relevant to the films considered. All essays also... more...

"If one laughs when David Hackett Fischer sits down to play, one will stay to cheer. His book must be read three times: the first in anger, the srcond in laughter, the third in respect....The wisdom is expressed with a certin ruthlessness. Scarcly a major historian escapes unscathed. Ten thousand members of the AmericanHistorical Association will rush to the index and breathe a little easier to find their names absent.

Hegel’s philosophy of history―which most critics view as a theory of inevitable progress toward modern European civilization―is widely regarded as a failure today. In Does History Make Sense? Terry Pinkard argues that Hegel’s understanding of historical progress is not the kind of teleological or progressivist account that its detractors claim, but is based on a subtle understanding of human subjectivity. Pinkard shows that... more...

        = "It is a magnificent epic," said William H. Prescott after the publication of History of the Conquest of Mexico in 1843. Since then, his sweeping account of Cortés's subjugation of the Aztec people has endured as a landmark work of scholarship and dramatic storytelling. This pioneering study presents a compelling view of the clash of civilizations that reverberates in Latin America to this day.... more...