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"Snacks" is a history of Canadian snack foods, of the independent producers and workers who make them, and of the consumers who can’t put them down. Janis Thiessen profiles several iconic Canadian snack food companies, including Old Dutch Potato Chips, Hawkins Cheezies, and chocolate maker Ganong. These companies have developed in distinctive ways, reflecting the unique stories of their founders and their intense connection to specific locations.... more...

Expanding on his landmark Globe and Mail series in which he documented his travels down 16 of Canada's great rivers, Roy MacGregor tells the story of our country through the stories of its original highways, and how they sustain our spirit, identity and economy--past, present and future. No country is more blessed with fresh water than Canada. From the mouth of the Fraser River in BC, to the Bow in Alberta, the Red in Manitoba, the Gatineau,... more...

Shortly after the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1886, two young sisters from Pictou County, Nova Scotia, took the train west to British Columbia. Jessie and Annie McQueen each intended to teach there for three years and then return home. In fact they remained sojourners between British Columbia, Nova Scotia, and Ontario for much of their lives. Drawing on family correspondence and supported by extensive engagement... more...

Alfred Valdmanis is best known in Canada for his infamous role in Premier Joey Smallwood's scheme to industrialize Newfoundland. A Latvian immigrant, he was appointed Director General of Economic Development in 1950 with the understanding that through his connections to Europe he could entice German and Baltic industrialists to the isolated, rural island. His influence was brought to an abrupt end when, in 1954, he was charged with... more...

Rogues and Rebels introduces us to dozens of larger-than-life Westerners--some infamous, some obscure--who dared to be different. Brian Brennan chronicles the mavericks, iconoclasts, and adventurers who threw away the rulebook, thumbed their noses at convention, and let their detractors howl. They never retracted, never explained, never apologized, and they got things done. Discover the unforgettable characters who made the West what it is... more...


Cold Case Vancouver delves into fifty years of some of Vancouver's most baffling unsolved murders. In 1953, two little boys were found murdered in the city's storied Stanley Park, and who remain unidentified to this day. In 1975, a country singer was murdered just as she was on the verge of an amazing career. And in 1994, Nick Masee, a retired banker with connections to the renegade Vancouver Stock Exchange,... more...

Eleven children between the ages of nine and eighteen-years-old were abducted, raped, sodomized and either strangled or knifed to death. Clifford Olson was not only a serial killer, but a true psychopath. And once again, the Canadian government made a deal with the devil, as they did with Karla Homolka and Dr. Shirley Turner. Olson held the location of the bodies for ransom and was paid $10,000 for each burial site.  This is a... more...

Introduction by RJ Parker - Psychopaths: Nature v Nurture    Murder, necrophilia, dismemberment and an international manhunt - while the case of Luka Magnotta reads like a work of fiction, it is in fact a true story of an individual with a long history of mental illness in a gruesome attempt to gain notoriety.    The horrific murder and mutilation of 32-year-old Concordia student Lin Jun shocked and captivated the... more...

Now that the publication bans are lifted, you need Stevie Cameron to get the whole story, which includes accounts of Pickton's notoriety that police never uncovered. You need On the Farm. Covering the case of one of North America's most prolific serial killer gave Stevie Cameron access not only to the story as it unfolded over many years in two British Columbia courthouses, but also to information unknown to the police - and not in the transcripts of... more...

This is a long-overdue study of one of Canada's most important political relationships. Highly readable and engaging, this work details the relationship between Quebec lieutenant Ernest Lapointe and Prime Minister Mackenzie King, showing how the close association of the two affected Canadian history in many important ways. Lapointe was the dominant French Canadian in federal politics from the start of the 1920s to the early years of... more...