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An ancient design, emerging from Central Asia in the second millennium B.C., the composite bow was adopted by a staggering variety of cultures, from nomadic tribal peoples such as the Huns, Turks, and Mongols, to mighty empires such as the Romans, Byzantines, Persians, Arabs, and Chinese. Offering high power and portability, the composite bow was an ideal cavalry weapon, though it was also used by infantry in open battle, and as a siege weapon. In this... more...

The Trojan War is the most famous conflict in history, the subject of Homer's "Iliad," one of the cornerstones of Western literature. Although many readers know that this literary masterwork is based on actual events, there is disagreement about how much of Homer's tale is true. Drawing on recent archeological research, historian and classicist Barry Strauss explains what really happened in Troy more than 3,000 years ago.For many years it was thought... more...

"In the first complete chronological narrative of the species from emergence to extinction...archaeologist Dimitra Papagianni and science historian Michael Morse have shaped a gem." ―Nature In recent years, the common perception of the Neanderthals has been transformed, thanks to new discoveries and paradigm-shattering scientific innovations. It turns out that the Neanderthals’ behavior was surprisingly modern: they buried the dead,... more...

A History of the Roman People provides a comprehensive analytical survey of Roman history from its prehistoric roots in Italy and the wider Mediterranean world to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity ca. A.D. 600. Clearly organized and highly readable, the text's narrative of major political and military events provides a chronological and conceptual framework for chapters on social, economic, and cultural developments... more...

First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Divination and Human Nature casts a new perspective on the rich tradition of ancient divination―the reading of divine signs in oracles, omens, and dreams. Popular attitudes during classical antiquity saw these readings as signs from the gods while modern scholars have treated such beliefs as primitive superstitions. In this book, Peter Struck reveals instead that such phenomena provoked an entirely different accounting from the... more...

This is the sixth and final volume of the major Commentary on Homer's Iliad now being prepared under the General Editorship of Professor G. S. Kirk. It discusses the last four books of the poem in detail, and its main purpose is to help readers to appreciate the poetic and narrative qualities of the work. There is no other study comparable to this in scale and detail in English. The introduction also discusses the structure and main themes of the poem,... more...

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This volume reprints a number of key brief essays by Karl-Wilhelm Welwei which were originally published between 1972 and 2001. Their main theme is the transformation of Rome's political system during the transition from the Republic to the early imperial period. However, they also touch upon such themes as slavery during the early Republic, the Punic Wars, imperial propaganda, the place of Germany in Roman foreign affairs, Tacitus and Caracallas.... more...

'Where am I?'. Our physical orientation in place is one of the defining characteristics of our embodied existence. However, while there is no human life, culture, or action without a specific location functioning as its setting, people go much further than this bare fact in attributing meaning and value to their physical environment. 'Landscape' denotes this symbolic conception and use of terrain. It is a creation of human culture. In Valuing Landscape... more...